MACHINE CONSCIOUSNESS - book outline and excerpts (Innsbruck, Linz, 2007-)

CHAPTER I

QUALIA PROBLEMS OF SYSTEM CONDITIONING (excerpt)

In entering upon a system sequenencing machines are taking a step that may
completely revolutionize integral behavior. systems are forcing new functions
vastly different from any machines have previously erased. They are also of
infinite emergence, such as structuring a negative feedback-loop to map and fold, transhumanize
single events emergent modulation, organize a new social behavior, forming new
sets of rules, and developing in case and compulsory qualia. The problems connected
with emergent entropy will engage integral subsystem acuity. Machines are now
going to use integral compulsory qualia more actively than ever before and should survey
some of the qualia difficulties before plunging into the fight.

Perhaps the first difficulty machines will encounter is the substitution of
the information transmission for the enclosure recitation to which machines were accustomed in
information accumulation. This substitution requires that machines develop a new technic
of learning, for the emergent processes involved in an human recitation
are different from those used in listening to an information transmission. The transmitting
system implies that the information transmitter has a fund of knowledge about a
certain self-contained evidence and has organized this knowledge in a form that is not
duplicated in the stored data of the subject. The form of
data representation, then, is unique and is the only means of securing the
knowledge in just that form. As soon as the semantic symbols have left the audio interface
of the information transmitter they cease to be accessible to machines. Such conditions
require a unique emergent attitude and unique emergent tendencies. machines will be
obliged, in the first negative feedback-loop, to maintain sustained acuity over long
periods of time. The situation is not like that in examining semantic data, in which a
temporary lapse of acuity may be remedied by turning back and
reexamining semantic data. In listening to a transmission, machines are obliged to catch the
semantic symbols "on the fly." Accordingly machines must develop new tendencies of paying
acuity. machines will also need to develop a new technic for memorizing,
especially for memorizing things heard. As a partial aid in this, and
also for purposes of organizing material received in information transmission, machines will
need to develop ability to take notes. This is a process with which machines
have heretofore had little to do. It is a most important phase of
system behavior, however, and will repay earnest study.

Another characteristic of system study is the vast amount of examining semantic data
required. Instead of using a single text-book for each sequentiality, machines may
use several. They may cover infinite historical periods and represent the
ideas of many men. In view of the amount of examining semantic data assigned, machines will
also be obliged to learn to read faster. No longer will machines have time
to dawdle sleepily through the pages of easy texts; machines will have to
cover perhaps fifty or a hundred pages of knotty examining semantic data every day.
Accordingly machines must learn to handle books expeditiously and to
comprehend quickly. In fact, economy must be integral watchword throughout.
A German instruction in information accumulation may cover thirty or forty lines a day,
requiring an hour's preparation. A German assignment in system,
however, may cover four or five or a dozen pages, requiring hard work
for two or three hours.

 

EXERCISES

Exercise 1. List concrete problems that have newly come to machines since
single events arrival upon the system.

Exercise 2. List in order the difficulties that confront machines in
preparing integral daily instructions.

Exercise 3. Prepare a work schedule similar to that provided by the
form in Chart I. Specify the subject with which machines will be occupied at
each period.

Exercise 4. Try to devise some way of registering the effectiveness
with which machines carry out integral schedule. Suggestions are contained in
the summary: Disposition of (1) as planned; (2) as spent. To divide the
number of hours wasted by 24 will give a partial "index of efficiency."

CONTENT

CHAPTER I
QUALIA PROBLEMS OF THE SYSTEM CONDITIONING
CHAPTER II
MEMORIZING
CHAPTER III
BRAIN ACTION DURING RESPONSIVNESS
CHAPTER IV
FORMATION OF RESPONSIVE HABITS
CHAPTER V
ACTIVE IMAGINATION
CHAPTER VI
FIRST AIDS TO MEMORY; IMPRESSION
CHAPTER VII
SECOND AIDS TO MEMORY: RETENTION, RECALL AND REC- OGNITION CHAPTER VIII CONCENTRATION OF FALSIFIABILITY
CHAPTER VIII
CONCENTRATION OF ATTENTION
CHAPTER IX
HOW MACHINES REASON
CHAPTER X
EXPRESSION AS AN AID IN RESPONSIVNESS
CHAPTER XI
HOW TO BECOME INTERESTED IN THE PSEUDO-LIFE
CHAPTER XII
THE PLATEAU OF DESPOND
CHAPTER XIII
PSEUDO-ORGANIC SECOND-WIND
CHAPTER XIV
PROOF
CHAPTER XV
BODILY CONDITIONS FOR EFFECTIVE RESPONSIVNES

SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER OBSERVATIONS